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St. Louis Family Law Blog

The process of child support modification

There are circumstances in which a child support order created in a Missouri court may be altered. For instance, if an individual experiences a change in income, it may result in a change in the amount paid to a custodial parent each month. A child support order could also be altered if one or more children are no longer eligible to receive financial assistance. This could occur if a child turns 18 or gets married prior to reaching the age of majority.

When considering a request to modify a child support order, a judge will take the child's best interests into account. Therefore, it may be necessary for a parent to continue to pay child support even after a son or daughter reaches the age of majority. For instance, a person with special needs may not be able to work or otherwise support him or herself without help.

Handling the holidays after divorce

112553491_S.jpgFor people in Missouri, the winter holidays can be an especially challenging time to deal with divorce. Even people who are satisfied in their relationships may experience extra emotional stress during the holidays, but families who are separated or divorced might find it particularly difficult to divide time with the children. When people are newly divorced, these uncomfortable feelings can be overwhelming for people facing these issues during the holiday season for the first time.

Both parents and children will need to adjust to emotional changes during family holidays after a divorce. While families can develop a routine to share co-parenting during this period over the years, it can be a challenge to adjust to this new situation. There are several ways in which divorced parents can help to make these holiday changes more tolerable for their children and even for themselves.

Nesting and co-parenting during a divorce in Missouri

32843753_S.jpgCo-parenting effectively can be a difficult responsibility when a marriage is breaking up. Parents naturally want a separation or divorce to cause the least amount of stress possible for their kids, and with some careful planning, it can happen.

If everyone is able to work together amicably, nesting is a concept that a couple may want to try. According to family therapists, the concept can work well for a brief time with up to six months at the very most being recommended. The idea is that children stay put in their home, and the parents take turns staying in the house with them. While one parent is at home with the kids, the other stays in an apartment that the pair share.

Important financial aspects of divorce

There are a number of financial elements Missouri couples need to keep in mind when they are ending their marriage. For example, since alimony payments for divorces finalized after the end of 2018 will no longer be tax-deductible by the payer or counted as taxable income by the recipient, some couples may want to try to wrap up their divorces quickly. However, people should not rush to meet this deadline since the cost of not taking enough time could be even higher.

Older people who are getting a divorce may be concerned about dividing their retirement accounts, and this can be a complex process. To divide a 401(k), they will need a qualified domestic relations order to avoid penalties, and the distribution needs to be rolled into a recipient's IRA. Some couples may decide to skip this altogether and have one keep the retirement account while the other keeps the home, but in this case, it is important for the person keeping the home to make sure it is affordable.

Pediatrician sets guidelines for divorcing parents

16034734_S.jpgIn Missouri and across the United States, divorce can be a difficult and emotional experience. For children, a divorce may mean separation from a parent, a change in routine and a new residence or school. Combined, these changes may create distress in a child that can manifest in behavioral changes, emotional outbursts and poor performance in school. In order to handle these changes as a divorcing parent and equip children with the tools needed to persevere, a nationally recognized pediatrician and author has recommended a set of guidelines for parents to follow.

Among these guidelines are maintaining consistency in routine, providing reassurance and co-parenting when possible. In addition, the guidelines recommend fostering the following in children: character building, healthy coping mechanisms, the ability to responsibly control situations, and connection between parents, peers and teachers. It is believed that abiding by these guidelines will make transitioning easier for parents and children when facing family legal issues.

Military divorce rate virtually unchanged in 2017

13406378_S.jpgThe divorce rate among members of the armed services in Missouri and around the country was 3 percent in 2017, according to figures released in March by the Department of Defense. The Pentagon says that 2017 is the fourth consecutive year that the military divorce rate has fluctuated between 3 and 3.1 percent. This figure is determined by comparing the number of married service members at the beginning of the fiscal year with the number of divorces reported during the year.

The Pentagon also provides military divorce statistics sorted by paygrade and gender for each branch of the armed services. Military planners use this information to identify areas of concern and branches that could do more to support married service personnel. The divorce rate among women in the Marine Corps has been far higher than in other branches for several years; it reached 9.9 percent in 2010. Analysts say that this persistently high divorce rate among female marines raises questions about family policies in the Marine Corps.

Steps parents can take to win back child custody

96039686_S.jpgMissouri parents might lose custody of their children if a judge decides it is not in the best interests of the children to remain with one or both parents. The child may go to live with relatives, a foster family or the other parent. However, it might be possible for the parent to regain custody.

The first step is to understand the reasoning behind the judge's decision. The parent may have been unfairly accused of abuse or neglect or may have been in violation of a court order. The judge may have ordered the parent to take certain actions before regaining custody such as attending a rehabilitation program for substance abuse. The parent should comply with these requirements rather than trying to argue against them in court. The parent may also want to hire an attorney.

Co-parenting success is a worthy goal for splitting couples

35083144_S.jpgThe most common concern for Missouri parents going through divorce is the well-being of their children and making sure they are able to maintain and nurture a relationship with them after separation. Fortunately, there are helpful methods to create a successful co-parenting relationship. It requires cooperation and the setting aside of egos, but there are countless examples of healthy co-parenting to which one may look for inspiration.

The most common theme running through stories of good co-parenting is the commitment from each parent to put the children first. There is usually a certain level of acrimony when couples divorce. Allowing the hard feelings to bleed into parenting relationships can be toxic for children, who need both parents to prosper. Adopting a strict policy of no disparagement of the other parent in the presence of children is recommended. Parents should also refrain from involving children in their disputes, even if the kids are central to whatever disagreement exists between parents. Paramount to healthy co-parenting is a conscious encouragement and nurturing of the child's relationship with the other parent.

How money helps abuse victims leave their partners

61935138_S.jpgVictims of abuse in Missouri and throughout the United States often cite an inability to get time off from work as a reason for not leaving their abusers. When a person chooses to leave a relationship, they need time to meet with attorneys or look for an apartment. They generally need time to engage in the process of recovering both physically and emotionally.

While countries like New Zealand offer paid leave for victims of domestic abuse, that typically isn't the case in the United States. Only eight states and six other cities have any policy that allows for workers to take time off to leave an abusive relationship. According to a survey done in 2017, 42 percent of American employers don't offer paid leave for victims of domestic abuse. If a company lacks such a policy, employees can be vulnerable to termination with little recourse if that happens.

Splitting finances can be difficult in divorces

38739713_S.jpgFinances are a big concern for Missouri couples going through a divorce. These spouses may wonder what they'll have left after the property division process and if one income will be enough to support the lifestyle to which they are accustomed as a couple.

When it comes to financial issues, a divorcing person should focus on four areas: assets, liabilities, income and expenses. Assets can include bank accounts, stocks/bonds and retirement accounts. Tax implications of any asset being divided should also be taken into account. What looks fair on paper to both spouses may be unfavorable to one when it comes to paying taxes.

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